Hiring Your Dream Team – The Ultimate 7 Point Checklist for Small Business Owners

The backbone of a great business is the people working hard to make it a success.

If you’re a ‘one man band’ looking to expand your services, you may have the capital and experience to know what you need from a ‘dream team,’…but you may not be 100% sure on how to go about finding them.

This post will run through a seven-point checklist for hiring your dream team to help you ace your search and hiring Dream Team.

#1. Define The Role

Whether it’s your first hire as an entrepreneur or your 20th, taking on new staff always presents challenges. As CEO, it is your job to ensure that you make the right choice with your new candidate, as you could potentially lose out on profits once you factor in the cost of advertising, recruitment, administration, and so on.

First, make a list of all the core competencies you need from the new hire. If you are relatively new to the business, this may mean that you would be looking for someone with a range of talents. Or, at least someone who is willing and quick to learn, provided they excel within certain areas, e.g. sales.

If you’re more established, you may be looking for a highly skilled team member to carry out niche processes. A ‘jack of all trades,’ in these cases, may not be such a good fit. Conduct lots of research by looking at advertisements for similar job roles in other companies, taking note of the going rates of pay, qualifications, years of experience, etc.

#2. Outsource Where You Can

The wealth of options available for entrepreneurs looking to outsource certain tasks has coincided with the boom of the VA (virtual assistant) industry.

If you are looking for a particular task, like a website build or social media management, you can avoid taking on a full-time marketer and instead break up these duties into discrete tasks, projects, and contracts. Find a suitable remote worker from Upwork or PeopleByTheHour to do the jobs instead, saving you a lot of money.

#3. Define Your Values

To ensure that the new hire fits in with your company culture, you will first need to explain in clear terms what your company culture is.

Go back to your original business plan and forecasts for the next few years. and identify the traits you need to help you achieve the vision you have for your business.

#4. Define The Behavioral Attributes

Recruiters use psychometric tests to help them match the best personality types to varying job roles. Every company’s requirements will be different, even if the positions perform the same function.

Many of us have heard of the Myers-Briggs personality test, but for recruiters, this personality test reveals little about a candidate’s employability. A test called The Big Five is preferred over Myers-Briggs because it provides more insight on a person’s negative traits.

‘The Big Five’ can be tested in different ways. However, they work by giving people a score on the high-low scales of:

  • Extraversion
  • Agreeableness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Neuroticism
  • Openness

The language of these terms can seem alarming. However, it is important to remember that for certain roles, things like high agreeableness may not prove so useful (in negotiation roles, for example). Building a good sales team takes time and dedication — don’t be rushed into hiring ‘green’ salespeople as your profitability will plummet.

#5. Shortlisting Candidates

Once you have crafted your job role and defined your company values and key personality traits, it’s time to advertise and start the process of selecting candidates.

Prioritize your list of skills and behavioral attributes and give each of your potential candidates a score.

Once you have made your list for interview, decide how you’re going to assess their capabilities effectively. You may want to consider:

  • Interviews in front of a panel, or in groups
  • In-tray exercises where you give interviewees a task to complete representing one of their core competencies
  • Presentations (if you’re recruiting for a sales or marketing role)
  • One-day trials or extended probationary periods.Hiring Dream Team
                                              Image credit: unsplash

It’s recommended that you find out as much as you can about the candidate’s previous roles, and it’s also worth snooping around on social media to get a feel for them.

#6. Successfully Onboard The New Hire

Hiring your dream team doesn’t end when you draw-up their contract. It is commonly believed that it takes around 90 days to get your new hire up-to-speed and working productively.
Providing a thorough training and onboarding process takes time and careful planning.

Make training manuals, record video tutorials of ‘on-screen’ processes and provide all you can regarding automated tools to help them reduce time and error in mundane tasks.

  • You can find a range of automated solutions for every industry, things like:
    Plugins that can schedule social media posts, blog content, and inventory, all through your online storefront — train staff once, and you won’t have to keep asking them to do the same, mundane tasks
  • Financial automation tools can manage bookkeeping and accounts, generate invoices automatically, calculate sales tax, etc.
  • Chatbots and automated customer order tracking systems can streamline customer service tasks
  • RFID sensors and automated health and safety compliance software can be utilized for manufacturing and supply chain services

…the list is ever-growing and investing in new technologies, as well as staff, will help your business grow.

#7. Motivate Your Team Members

Once you have introduced your new staff and systems into the mix, it is down to you as a boss to do your best to provide a positive and productive place of work.

For more, check out this free checklist on How to Create High-Performing Teams.

One Last Thing…

Do bear in mind and plan financially for your staff to leave, or for their jobs to ‘expire’ as time goes on. As a business owner with a company on the rise, the skills you need in the beginning may not be as useful to you as time goes on.

Also, plan for your company culture to change and diversify in terms of personality fit, as the number of roles and operational complexity increase.

QUESTION: What’s your best tip (or question) on hiring great candidates? Share in the comments box below.

How to Motivate Your Sales Force

Even though most job descriptions for sales roles typically say that the candidate most be “self motivated”, as a business owner you’ve probably realized by now it is wishful thinking that merely hiring “self motivated” people will by itself, lead to creating high performing sales teams. Remember to keep your sales force motivated

Whether you have just one or two sales representatives or you have several dozen, either you as the business owner, or your sales manager (if you have one) need to play a vital role in keeping your sales force highly motivated.

Holding regular, effective sales meetings with your team is one way of keeping your team highly motivated. The key word here is “effective”. So, how does one make sure your sales meeting is effective?

This was the question asked recently but one of my email subscribers:

Q: “I have a team of 11 sales reps who have all been working for me for the past 5-10 yrs. I know I should be holding regular meetings with them, but I’m stuck on what to talk about each week.” ~ Bob Kelly from Austin, Texas

A: Bob, you are absolutely correct on having regular meetings with your team. Regular sales meetings is an essential key to grow your business. Every member of your team is expected to be better each day. I have come up a meeting structure for you which you can use to help motivate your sales force. I have used this same method myself in planning 1,000+ sales meetings I’ve delivered over the years.

Part I: KEEP YOU SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY RECOGNITION

Whether you’re have a team of 11 people, 80 or just 4 sales people, it sets a positive tone and energy to kick off your sales meeting with sincere recognition. Find something to recognize in some or all of your meeting attendees. In addition to verbally recognizing people it’s important to add visuals. People like to see their names in writing. It can be as simple as writing congratulation messages on poster boards and plastering them throughout your conference room or as formal as having a new name engraved each week or month on a sales award plaque.

You can reinforce that recognition in bi-weekly emails to your sales team as well as including it in the printed version of your sales meeting agenda.

Recognition is especially addicting for sales people, so make sure you apply generously to your team. When you recognize positive behavior you attract more of that same positive behavior.

Avoid falling into the trap of negative thinking like — “why should I recognize them for just doing their job?” Because when you take that philosophy you will likely end up going many weeks without giving any recognition at all.

As a mother, anytime my husband or kids tell me I made a great dinner it not only makes me feel appreciated (even though it’s my job to feed them) it also motivates me to make an even better dinner the next meal.

Making your sales people feel appreciated goes a long way.

Part II: KEEP YOUR SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY INFORMATION

This is the housekeeping tid-bits — FYI kind of stuff you want everyone to be aware of and note in their calendars, project folders, etc.

This part of the sales meeting is for you to share things like:

  • Here are two new marketing resources now available to you.
  • Here are upcoming deadlines in our company…
  • Reminders… etc

Part III: KEEP YOUR SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY INSTRUCTIONS

Never undermine the importance of ongoing training. Sometimes I hear from some grow your business that they don’t need to train their top sales people because they’ve been doing their jobs for 10 years, and they know what they’re doing.

I emphatically disagree!

That’s like expecting pro football players to skip the training camp and send them right into the kickoff game – bad idea! Spend 30-45 min during your weekly sales team meetings to help your people improve one specific skill they use and need, so they can better perform in their jobs. Trust me, even for your seasoned sales reps you’ll never run out of drill-for-skill content.

Part IV: KEEP YOUR SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY INSPIRATION

It’s often more effective for your people to be inspired by the milestones achieved by their own colleagues than just being talked at the entire meeting by their boss.

You want to leverage the fact that sales attracts people who tend to have a competitive spirit, so inviting the week’s top performer to teach their peers is a powerful motivation for both for the person teaching and for their peers taking notes.

The person teaching ends up feeling like they now have a reputation they need to keep. And, their peers end up thinking — “hey, if they can do it, so can I” or “I can do even better than that”. By doing so people will see this as friendly competition, keeps your sales force motivated to hone their skills further.

So, invite one of your sales leaders to share for 5-15 minutes on how they achieved ______.

Examples:

How I got 85% of my leads to return my calls this week.
How I got 200% more referrals this month.
How I got all the decision makers to attend the 1st presentation meeting.
How I have my best sales month ever.

Inspiration appeals to their competitive spirit. It raises the bar and provides proof that it can be done. Click To Tweet.

 

Part V: SALES FORCE MOTIVATED ENFORCEMENT

This is the fifth and final part of your sales meeting. You, as their boss/sales manager make a big impact in keeping your sales force motivated or de-motivating your sales team. We see this happening all the time in sports. A football team won’t play their best if they’re constantly barked at by a dictatorship style coach or by a coach who appears hands off and indifferent.

They have to want to excel. Even the people who insisted they were self-motivated will still perform far better with a deliberate dose of motivational words from you each week as their leader keeps your sales force motivated.

While instruction gets their head in the game; motivation gets their heart in the game. Click To Tweet

 

I always like to see a weekly sales meeting end with a motivation piece with what I call a wind up talk.

People don’t really get passionate about the products and services you sell as a company (sorry to break that news to you!)

But, what they do get passionate about resonating with why you do what you do. They rally around what you believe as a company, but more importantly, that you believe in them.

People inherently, want to be great and do great things. Your motivational wind up talk should serve to helping them become the champions they have the potential to be.

As Vince Lombardi so famously said: “Treat them as champions, and they play like champions.”

As you plan out your motivational wind up talk think about:

  • Why this week is different? What is at stake this month?
  • What is the target you want them to stretch to reach and why should they care?
  • How can you help your people get out of their comfort zone?
  • What’s it all for this quarter?
  • What personal success skills do you want to help them develop? The power of perseverance, tenacity, positive expectation, resiliency, resourcefulness, etc.

Ok, so to summarize what you’re aiming to accomplish using this 5-part sales meeting formula:

Part 1: SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY RECOGNITION = “I feel appreciated” [I work hard for me because I’m addicted to recognition]

Part 2: SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY INFORMATION = “I feel focused and organized”

Part 3: SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BY INSPIRATION = (Peer proof) “If they can do it; I can do it too” [I work hard for my peers because I’m competitive]

Part 4 SALES FORCE MOTIVATED BYINSTRUCTION = “I feel equipped to succeed.”

Part 5 SALES FORCE MOTIVATED ENFORCEMENT = “I believe I can achieve higher” [I work hard for you because I know how much you care about my success]

In closing, if you need more guidance on creating high performing sales teams I invite you to book a complimentary discovery call with me here:
https://www.paramountbusinesscoach.com/coaching-call-sign-up/

QUESTION: How often do you run sales meetings with your team and how do you know it was effective? Please share your comments in the comment box below.

© Copyright 2018  Paramount Business Coach  All rights reserved. 

How to Create High Performing Teams

If you don’t know how to create high performing teams then managing a staff will quickly feel like a burden and drain your time, energy and money. But, the alternative is just not acceptable either.

You don’t want to resort to wearing all the hats in your business or you’ll quickly burn out and so will your sales. Trying to grow your business all by yourself is definitely the LONG, SLOW way to go. Even if you are running a solo practice you’ll grow your business much faster with a small team of just you and one other person.

When you create high performing teams you no longer have to “babysit” your staff or waste precious hours each week chasing after them to meet deadlines.

If you want to know the secret to creating high performing teams — onsite employees or a virtual team, then don’t miss this week’s Q&A episode.

This might sounds like a simple question, but it is definitely not a one answer solution.

In this week’s Q&A episode you’ll discover:

* Strategies for holding your virtual assistant (and onsite team) accountable, so you don’t have to constantly follow up with them.
* How to build team morale even when everyone is living thousands of miles away from each other.
* Plus! I have a special free 11-point checklist you can download to help you create your very own high performing team!

Click the audio or video below.

Then, be sure to share your questions and comments below. I’d love to know what your biggest challenges are when it comes to managing your team.

Yoon ~

PS. Ok, I gotta tell you … I am loving recording these Q&A episodes for you!

This feels so much more interactive for me to hear your questions directly from your voice messages. The feedback I’ve gotten so far is that you love being able to listen on the go. And, many of you shared you like that I do a much deeper dive on the audio than I can typically cover in a text only blog.

I have to say, it’s definitely a win-win because these audio and video sessions are so much faster for me to record than writing everything out on a regular blog. (Believe it or not, I am a painfully slow writer!)

So, as long as you guys keep sending me questions I will keep sending you the mini lessons through the audio blog and vlog format.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Ok, so this week we are tackling part 2 and 3 from questions submitted by Morgan Robinson:

She asks: “How to find the right VA? … How to keep a virtual team accountable and how to build team morale?”

How to Create High Performing Virtual Teams [WATCH VIDEO]

 

How to Create High Performing Virtual Teams [LISTEN to AUDIO]

 

PPS. If you missed Part 1 of Morgan’s question listen to last week’s episode here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download Create High Performing Teams Checklist

 

Want to have your question featured on future episodes? Just record your voice message here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Find Right Virtual Assistants

Need to Find Right Virtual Assistants?

Signs you need to find right virtual assistants: You’re drowning in an endless to-do list … you feel overwhelmed all the time … you always feel behind in hitting your goals … you’re stuck spinning your wheels … you’re exhausted and feeling burned out …  you wear every hat in your business.

If any of those sound like you, then it’s definitely time to hire help!

Oh, and by the way, in case you’re not familiar with the term “virtual assistant” it’s just someone you hire who works virtually. So, they can work from their home and you don’t need to dedicate a full office space to bring on more help.

So, this week’s Q&A episode I answer Morgan Robinson’s question about how to find right virtual assistants.  You’ll discover key tips on how to figure out what type of VA you need, best places to find right virtual assistants, my simple process for determining the right and wrong hires and how to set yourself up for success working with a new virtual assistant.

NOTE: If you prefer to hire someone to work at your physical location, these same tips actually apply to both scenarios.

I also shared different answers on this similar topic in this previous episode. Listen to Hiring Tips here

This week’s Q&A episode is for you if:

  • you’re ready to hire your first virtual assistant, but you don’t know how to start
  • you’ve tried hiring people before with frustrating results
  • you know you just can’t do it all by yourselfOk, now let’s dive into this week’s Q&A episode.Grab a pen and paper and get ready to take some notes. Then be sure to share your comments and questions below. I’d love to know your greatest take-aways or specific points you’d like to get more clarity on.

Click the play button below to listen to the

AUDIO BLOG on How to Find Right Virtual Assistants:

 

Watch the VLOG on How to Find Right Virtual Assistants Here:

 

Want to have your question featured on future episodes? Just record your voice message here:
https://www.paramountbusinesscoach.com/Ask-Yoon/

 

QUESTION: Where do you get stuck when hiring a virtual assistant?
Share your comments and questions below. 

Hiring Tips for Small Business Owners – Q&A Episode

Hiring Tips for Small Business Owners

If you’re looking for great hiring tips, sales and marketing strategies then you’re in the right place! Growing a business is always full of new challenges at every stage of growth.  The good news is you don’t need to struggle with these challenges alone.

My Q&A episodes is a free resource I offer to help you get quick wins you need to boost your sales, productivity and profits.

If you’d like to submit your question simply leave me a voice message here.

Here’s what you want to say in your voice or comment message:

1. Your name
2. City and state you’re from.
3. Your question. (what is the result you want to achieve, your challenge?)
4. Your website url (OPTIONAL, but this will help me give you better feedback based on learning what business you’re in)

I’ll share my tips and advice in response. Be sure to share this great free resource with your friends!

This week’s question comes from Jeremy Robinson who asks great questions like: who to hire? … how to define his company’s organizational structure? … who to hire first? … how to define roles clearly and more.
You may be ready to hire additional full time employees to grow your team, but keep in mind if you are a solopreneur these same hiring tips also apply to you too!  If you’re a self employed business owner, taking your business to the next level needs to include hiring part time or full time freelancers / virtual assistants.

Watch the video episode here:

Listen to the audio here:

 

 

Grab the free resource mentioned in this episode:

Productivity Template

QUESTION: What is one strategy you will commit to implementing that I shared in this Q&A episode? I want to hear from you!  Share your comments and questions below.

Hiring Tips – How To Interview A Great Administrative Assistant

If you’ve been feeling overwhelmed, drowning in emails or you’d just like to work less hours in your business this year, it’s time to hire an admin assistant and follow these hiring tips. An administrative assistant has often been referred to as the office juggler — managing several tasks and wearing many hats at once.

Whether you’re a startup company or you are a seasoned entrepreneur, hiring the right person for the administrative assistant position is crucial. Here are four basic criteria to assess when interviewing potential candidates. This will help you save time, money and headaches from hiring the wrong person.

Hiring Tips # 1 – Consider the Appearance

The first person clients see when they walk into the office is likely going to be your assistant. This means whoever you hire for this position needs to make a good first impression, as well as effectively represent your company’s ethos and brand.

The old rules of office dress code — pantyhose, pencil skirts, neckties — no longer apply, in most work environments at least. But he or she needs to understand your corporate culture and embody it, dress included. This persona is hard to teach, but invaluable to have, so consider your candidates carefully before selecting one.

Clothes and accessories say a lot about how candidates feel about themselves, and what they value in life. Outward appearance speaks to who is inside.

Hiring Tips # 2 – Take Note of Verbal & Nonverbal Skills

When someone has good verbal skills, it’s easy to tell. And having the qualified candidates interview with several different people on your team will give you a quick look at how each applicant adapts to different people, personalities and situations.

Non-verbal cues are a bit more difficult to detect, but can be even more revealing. A great assistant will make eye contact often, mimic your body language and smile regularly. You want someone who will make everyone at your business feel at ease. Your administrative assistant needs to, above all, be approachable and inclusive.

Hiring Tips # 3 – Personality

Not only does a personality test reveal things about ourselves that we were unaware of, it can also provide insight into how an employee learns, functions and grows. Great leaders create other leaders, not worker bees.

If you can figure out what makes your prospective administrative assistant tick, what makes him passionate or what makes her react positively, then you can get a better idea of how the person will fit into your corporate culture, interact with co-workers and handle stress. While you don’t want to be hiring a mini you,  you also don’t want to hire someone whose personality clashes with you and your team.

Hiring Tips # 4 – Preparedness

One of the best ways to weed out the less serious candidates is to make a very simple request before the interview. An example email request: “Please bring a copy of your résumé to the interview.” Or “Please review our company website prior to your interview.” With just one question during the interview, you’ll be able to discern how detail-oriented the candidate is and it’s a great starting off point for an honest, productive hiring atmosphere.

QUESTION: What is your biggest challenge when it comes to finding a great admin assistant? Please share your comments and questions below.

© Copyright 2016